2,000 years of human culture

July 14, 2007 at 3:00 am Leave a comment

Wellcome imagesThis looks like a fabulous, free online resource. On the Creative Commons.org site, I found news of Wellcome Images – a source of images just launched on the history of medicine, modern biomedical science and clinical medicine, being made available under a Creative Commons License. For anyone interested in the study of the history of medicine and human culture, the fact that the images are coming under a CCL unlocks a vast store of historical knowledge for students, teachers, academics and members of the public.

The collection features some interesting stuff: an oil painting of Florence Nightingale; a picture depicting Charles Darwin as an ape (below); a photograph of Alexander Fleming in his laboratory; visual images from Chinese medicine. So I set about finding some curious images.

b0006228.jpg

This image is of blood vessels in the retina emerging from the optic disc (black). Amazingly colourful, you could almost hang this up as a piece of art in the home! Image credit: Freya Mowat.

Wellcome imagesIf this weren’t an image of something we all fear, you might almost be tempted to have this as a piece of art work too. The image shows human cancer cells in culture. Reminds me of peacock feathers. Image credit: Matthew Daniels.

l0003760.jpgHere’s a caricature of poor old Charles Darwin depicted as an ape and holding up a mirror so a fellow ape can catch a glimpse of himself. Image credit: Wellcome Library, London.

l0022522-1.jpgHere’s a fascinating 1904 photo of Pavlov conducting an experiment on a dog in the amphitheatre of the Physiological Laboratory, Imperial Military Medical Academy, St Petersburg. Image credit: Wellcome Library, London.

Wellcome imagesAnd finally, a Parisian lithograph from the late 19th Century – a chart showing the basic elements of phrenology, physiognomy and palmistry, with diagrams of heads and hands, and portraits of historical figures. Image credit: Wellcome Library, London.

Credit for image accompanying this post: Prof R Bellairs. Image shows a 13 day chick embryo that has been stained to highlight the skeleton. The blue stain shows cartilage; the red stain shows areas where bone has started to form.

Advertisements

Entry filed under: Charles Darwin, Creative Commons, Medicine, Science, Useful resources.

Old crafts disappearing Surveillance in Australian schools

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

Trackback this post  |  Subscribe to the comments via RSS Feed


Search ThinkingShift

   Made in New Zealand
     Thinkingshift is?

Flickr Photos

 
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 2.5 Australia License.

ThinkingShift Book Club


Kimmar - Find me on Bloggers.com

%d bloggers like this: